How can the European Union act as a normative power in the green transition?

Research Paper by Ionuț-Mircea MARCU

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The European Union normative power long-term ambitions are connected to its ability to promote climate regulations on the global stage.

#green normative power #climate regulations #EU values and norms


Abstract

For the European Union, tackling the challenging global context is one of the greatest priorities for its future, and the green transition could create the greatest impact, both at the economic level, as well as politically. Described by various authors as a soft power, lacking therefore the capabilities of a hard power actor, the EU has been acting as a normative power, a concept describing an international actor who can promote its values and regulations in relations to its third parties. The EU does not lack incentives for convincing outside states and partners to adopt EU values and norms. For aspiring or candidates to membership, the Enlargement Policy is in many ways a real instrument of Europeanisation. For partners outside of Europe, trade deals and the economic importance of the EU create the opportunity for the EU to assert its position on topics it considers strategic. The aim of this project is to investigate and evaluate the instruments available to EU institutions in order to promote and protect its standards and values, both in its relations with countries from the Western Balkans and the Eastern Partnership, as well as in connection with other global partners, especially in the policy areas related to the green economic transition, in the context of the European Green Deal. The emphasis put on the green economic transformation is explained by its extensive transformative characteristic, as well as its long-term consequences.


About the author

Ionuț-Mircea MARCU is an expert at the European Institute of Romania and a PhD Candidate at the University of Bucharest and École des hautes études en sciences sociales Paris. He has received fellowships and scholarships from Konrad Adenaur Stiftung, the Institute for the Investigation of Communist Crimes and the Memory of Romanian Exile, and Centre Régional Francophone de Recherches Avancées en Sciences Sociales.